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nation's history, it was the states rather than federal government that controlled access to religious worship, the rights of religious organizations and so on. and in the early decades of the 20th century, that began to shift as the supreme court applied the national constitutional establishment and free exercise clauses of the first amendment against the states sort of centralizing debates about religion. >> host: but if the states had the control, we had it written into our constitution, freedom of religion. >> guest: we did, indeed. but the first amendment begins "congress shall enact no law." so it was addressed only to the national government. >> host: were there restrictions by different states on religion? >> guest: oh, yes, there were. several states had religious establishments. most states limited the amount of property a religious organization could own. some taxed religious property. others banned given groups' practices. i'm thinking, for example, eventually various states in the southwest banning polygamy, for example. >> host: so when it came to massachusetts, talk abou
, with businesses, entrepreneurs, state government, all working economy was brought low by the gross irresponsibility by those on wall street. as a result we have suffered 4 years of recession, with almost 300,000 people in washington looking for work. too many of our families are on the brink of losing their home. parents lie awake at night wondering how they can provide for their children's future. but we remain an optimistic state, a visionary state and an innovative state. time has not dimmed and the recession has not diminished our thirst for innovation and our talent for technological growth. we are the most creative, entrepreneurial group of business men and women, scientists, educators and workers on the planet. companies like silicon energy in marysville are leading the world with some of the most durable solar cells ever built. janicki industries in sedro- wooley is driving innovation in aerospace. valve, a software company in bellevue has grown into a worldwide leader in interactive entertainment. and in grays harbor an across- the-board effort led to the re- opening of th
government programs don't work and a blueprint for change. doctors gellous, i'm here from the government and i'm here to help you. is that not true? >> not true. >> host: why not? na because most government social programs, which is designed to help people, don't actually help. in some instances, it is little more than the -- i hate saying this -- the do-gooder full employment act. provides lots of jobs to people who would like to help. but the end of the day, if you look at whether the needle has been moved, and people have really been helped by substantial government programs and substantial amounts of money, the bottom line is very rarely are people helped. and i thought that was a story worth telling. the idea came to me as i was being smuggled into the back door of the state house in the state of hawai'i for a meeting with the secretary -- the speaker of the house. hawaii was spending half a billion dollars a year on special education. part of that was subsidized by the federal government under the individuals with disabilities education act. the rest was being paid for by the taxp
of big government is back. >> bill: liberals all over the country is overjoyed that obama is going to continue the spending on social justice. why does the left not see the economic danger though. charles krauthammer and george stephanopoulos will weigh in. >> good people stayed in their houses and didn't speak up when there was carnage in the streets and total violation of the fund mental rights of african-americans as they marched in selma. >> bill: tom brokaw comparing the gun control debate to civil rights. is that right? we'll debate that. >> tell bill i said hey. >> are you going to come on the show one of these days? >> sure. i have been invited? >> you have. >> bill: jesse watters confronting collin powell at the inaugurations even as the general echos another white house opinion. watters world tonight. >> o'reilly, i have been on a couple of his lists. [ laughter ] >> bill: caution, you where to enter the no spin zone. the factor begins right now. >> bill: hi, i'm bill o'reilly. thanks for watching us tonight. bill o'reilly and liberalism. that is the subject of this eveni
government actually reacted quite favorably and also responded to our demand with a change, a certain change in their policies. i must admit that i looked with a certain degree of concern at japan right now. for europe, too, it's going to be important, um, that the big injection of liquidity that was given into the markets for the sake of the banks is siphoned off again. but i think the ecb is, actually, here a very positive force. they're playing a very positive role, and they will see to it that one refrains from the policy of manipulation and that, um, one pursues a policy that actually reflects the situation as it is that everyone is doing it as is the ecb. i think we would have less problems all over the world, but that's about the extent of my comment. [speaking german] >> translator: since you've touched upon central banks, what exactly are the objectives of central banks? we have the federal reserve that has set itself an additional objective, we've seen the more recent developments in japan. what did you think about the independence? you touched upon it, alluded to it. maybe you cou
as online -- send us a tweet by typing @c spanwj. state and local governments are on their best financial shape since the recession. given leeway to cushion the u.s. economy from federal budget cuts. here are some other stories in the news. this is from "the national council of state legislatures," which runs up what lawmakers are facing as they enter their session throughout the country. it says, -- it also looks at corrections costs. helping america become more energy dependent. and paying for transportation structure, roads, bridges, things like that. also, educating the workforce. let us take a listen to one of the governor's and what he had the say during this state of the state address. this is the governor of new york talking about new york state. >> yes it is hard to reform education. i know the politics of it. i know the problems. i know the issues. but, can you imagining how smart the state would be when we actually educate all of our children to the best of their god-given potential? when every black child and every white child and every orphan child and every other child is ed
-- you want to shut down the government, have at it. i was here when it happened before. you'll find all your constituents up close and personal. you'll get to know them. that's a lot different. that's a lot different action. you want to go off just ration, you don't like the cuts -- sequestration, you don't like the cuts, fine. you told the american people with your votes, you're prepared to have sequestration if we didn't do the job. so you got a lot of tough votes to make. don't try to avoid them by holding the credit worthiness of the united states at risk. it has got to stop and it should stop today on the floor of the house of representatives which says to the world, we are prepared to have this country pay the bills, the debts that were incurred by this action. it's got to stop today with a no vote against this legislation. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas. mr. sessions: thank you very much, mr. speaker. as always, this floor is open to people who have ideas. i'd like to say to the american people and to my colleagues that are listening, republican leadership has
supporter of the royal government and was driven out of town. >> on the other side of that, with now is so a different source of media we can to fact check them how often direct lies in order to gain support or to turn people directly to one side or the other? >> well, i mean, you are definitely finding exaggerations, whether it was drastic or not, what i was interested in finding was that a lot of newspaper accounts came with disclaimers pics of the publishers, these printers very much valued reliable sources. and if the source was questionable, they would frequently print that with the article from some sort of disclaimer. >> i remember there was a letter that was published after the battle of lexington and concord that talks about the british soldiers coming to the parsonage in lexington and rampaging through and killing the barnyard animals. that never happened. there's a letter about the battle of bunker hill that says that general howe, as soon as the soldiers reached charlestown can seldom try tried to desert and run away, and he had to them strung up immediately on greasy. that did
of the house of january 3, 2013, of the following individuals to serve as the governing board of the office of congressional ethics. the clerk: nominated by the speaker with the concurrence of the minority leader -- mr. porter j. goss, mr. egan, ms. hayward, mr. friendswood. nominated by the minority leader with the concurrence of the speaker -- mr. david scaggs of colorado, co-chairman. mrs. yvonne burke of california. ms. karen english of arizona. mr. mike barnes of maryland,ality -- alternate. the speaker pro tempore: the house will be in order. please take your conversations off the floor. the house -- the chair will now entertain requests for one-minutes. please take your conversations off the floor. for what purpose does the gentleman from pennsylvania rise? mr. thompson: i request unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. thompson: madam speaker, the house is not in order. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from pennsylvania deserves to be heard. please take your convers
knew more about libya than anybody else in our government did not see a direct threat of an attack of this nature and scale despite the overall trend of security problems that we faced. and i have to add, neither did the intelligence community. the arb makes that very clear. that the intelligence community also did not really zero in on the connection between the deteriorating threat environment in eastern libya and in benghazi. and a direct threat on our compound. so we have work to do. we have work to do inside the department. we have work to do with our partners and the d.o.d. and the intelligence community to constantly be taking in information, making sure it does get to the right people, that it isn't somehow stove piped or stalled. but that it does rise to decision makers. and i'm committed to improving every way that i can on what the arb told us to do on assessing our intelligence. and i think it's fair to say, congressman, that we have to do this now because i predict we're going to be as we saw in algeria seeing all kinds of asymmetric threats. not just to our government
's the author of this book, "the spirit of compromise: why governing demands it and campaigning undermines it." president gutmann, are we a politically compromised? >> guest: we were created in compromise. a lot of people think of the revolutionary war, which separated us from our mother country. but if you recall -- i know you weren't there then, but if you recall historically speaking our founding fathers crafted a compromise that created the constitution. they were as polarized as any set of americans have been throughout our country and our history. they were pro-and anti-slavery and the compromise. so yes, we were founded in compromise, that today compromises become more difficult than ever before. >> host: what do you mean when you talk about the uncompromising mindset? >> guest: we live in an era characterized as a permanent campaign, where everyday is election day in campaigning and election may make for uncompromising minds. you stand in your principles, mobilize your base, drawing endless amounts of money. 20 for seven new site will cover his politics is that it's a horserace and th
that they almost have to move were also much of their income is going to go to the government. gerri: us take a look at those numbers. his state tax will go to a 13%. that is a state income tax which means he will pay an additional 2 million in taxes. that doesn't even include the federal increase in taxes that we talk so much about the end of last year which would go to a 39 and a half%. this is a fella who has a net worth of 150 million, making money every single year. he will have a very big tax tab. >> absolutely. >> absolutely commit to the point where he is probably going to have to either move to another state income-tax state or have to move to the caribbean or move out of the estates. gerri: what is that? >> essentially, any place where an athlete place, within their jurisdiction they have to file taxes. so across all sports respectively they have to file in the state where they actually play in the game. any type of income that they receive based of their contract they have to file. the government wants their money. gerri: you were mentioning where he might go. take a look at the hi
of the progressive side and tried to draw a bound between the government ruled by elite and ruled by a mob and he talked about the government that we won which is infrastructure, education, regulation and the good things and recognize the government can't solve all the problems, i thought that was a reaching out, if you will, a shout to the tea party right that's rejectionist. >> as we saw in pennsylvania, and professional that morning there's so much of this willingness to win the election by the republicans, they know they're headed into trouble. many like lebanon, take the fences down. okay, we're never going to be popular again so we're going to have to rig it. >> sean: so it's the gettysburg address, obama. republicans are going to have to steal elections. that's how bad nbc's gotten, that's the coverage. >> a couple of points about this quote, unquote news network and this quote, unquote newsman. on the gettysburg address, chris mathews has it it exactly wrong. he has the opposite. the gettysburg address was an attempt at healing of nation' wounds at the end of the civil war. obama's speech
to the government can become prohibitive at times. so at life technologies what we've done is we try to focus our investments on technology that while the technology itself may be expensive, if you look holistically at the total cost of that patient event, it's significantly reducing the overall cost. let me tell you what i mean by that. if you have an $80,000 cancer drug regiment that only works in 25 percent of the patients, if we run a thousand dollar test and pick the 80% that don't receive benefit from that drug, not only do we spare the patient the side effects, we save health care a tremendous amount of cost. the administration, the obama administration a few years ago when we were in the throes of trying to figure out what we were going to do about health care, they used to quote some data, that $70 billion in 2008 was spent on oncology drugs and somewhere between 20 and 25 billion had no impact on the patient. so if we were to spend three billion in these amazing test capabilities to pick the 25 billion that wasn't going to respond, you save the overall health care costs. so we really ar
.s. in the world. if there is a humanitarian crisis, it is justifiable to enter the country to stop the government from doing that. but if its is you are just unseating leaders because they're not friendly to u.s. business interests or you are replacing them with leaders who are firmly to u.s. business interests, that it does become imperialism. bowlines are really blurry and we have to watch our step. military industrial complex in this country is really powerful. i don't want it to spill over to the rest of the world and become the imperialists. host: a few tweets -- and joseph writes -- that is assessing the passed four years. i want to read from the oliver north peace that we mentioned earlier from the washington times, talking about hillary clinton and her assessment of her work. it says it has created opportunities for u.s. citizens in places that have benefited our nation. oliver north is the host of stories."ar mike is next on the republican line in indianapolis. caller: in the last four years, the only factor in the cap of hillary clinton is the miles she has trouble. a relationship to in
our government did not see a direct threat of an attack of this scale despite the trend of security problems we faced. i have to add, neither did the intelligence community. the a.r.b. makes that very clear that the intelligence community also did thought really zero in on the connection between the deteriorating threat environment in eastern libya and benghazi and a direct threat on our compound. we have work to do, to take in the information, making sure it gets to the right people and it isn't somehow stovepiped or stalled. that it does rise to decision-makers. i am committed to improving every way i can on what a.r.b. toll us to do on assessing our intelligence. i predict we will see all kind of threats not just to our government facilities but to private sector-facilities. in tunisia, although we protected our embassy, our school was badly damaged. we have to take a broader view. the a.r.b. gives us a start. it is not the whole story. >> thank you secretary clinton for yourto securing america's place in the world the past four years. and your contributions to world peace. the f
of the government. >> do you have any concept of the number of american troops it might have take ton actually create a totally secure environment for him in benghazi on september 10 and 11? >> no. the number of diplomatic security personnel requested in the cables is five. there were five there that night. with him. plus there was a mutual understanding with the annex that had a much more heavily armed presence because of the work they were doing in the region. it is very difficult to, in retrospect, to really anticipate what might have been. one of the r.s.o.'s who had served in libya said the kind of attack the compound suffered had not been anticipated. we had gotten used to preparing for car bombs and suicide bombings and things like that but this was of a different nature. and we even saw that at the annex, which was much more heavily fort fid, had much more heavy military equipment, we lost two of our best and had one of our diplomatic security officers badly injured. he's still at walter reed. so even the annex which had more assets in the face of the attack was suffering losses that n
to that, it is almost entirely health care? >> well, there are examples throughout the federal government where the dollars are not spent wisely. we ought to treat it as other people's money because it is the money earned bit taxpayers and we have an obligation to make sure that we don't continue the wasteful ways of washington. we intend in the house of representatives to promote an agenda that allows for getting spending under control, not just in the health care area but in many other arenas, where even the gao has pointed out again and again there is a lot of room for improvement to rid the system of waste, fraud, and abuse. >>neil: do you think as the president makes his way to the reviewing stand, he is feet from us, literally, from where i am, before he moves to the review youing stand, do you think he is seizing on what he thinks is the advantage over congress and your popularity, collectively, republicans, sir, and he will get his way because you guys have not found yours. what do you say? >> listen, we are in the majority in the house of representatives because the voters of our
the first phase of the war, his government categorically rebuffed all attempts by black men to join the fight, to showing union armies. but on this question, the need for more soldiers to fight the war ultimately prove decisive. under the pressure coming in and post. from adequately excluding blacks in 1861 and 1862 to recruit enough and soldiers in 1863. at the end of the war, 200,000 black soldiers and sailors had served in the union cause. union policy towards those soldiers and sailors change too. first they were confined almost solely to noncombat tasks, but their courageous conduct whenever they came under fire eventually it led the union to welcome black troops into combat duty. here we have been trying a black troops playing a role with slaves in north carolina, a common theme in the last year of the war. as lincoln repeatedly acknowledged, these black soldiers prove crucial to the eventual union victory, freeing and recruiting non-comic and explained tirelessly the only policy that can or could save the union. and a substantial departure from this policy he said insurers th
if we recognize the new somaly government which could never have been possible out -- without the support, the u.n. was strongly behind it, we got other nations to invest. what we're looking at in west africa is to try to help support an african a.u. supported troop combination from a number of countries to really take the lead against the terrorists in northern mali. . this is hard. if the united states comes in and does something on her own, nobody can match us in military assets and prowess, but a lot of the challenges we face are not immediately or sustainbly solved by military action alone, therefore, we have to get countries in the region to increase their border security and increase their counterterrorist efforts inside their own boards. we have a lot to do now in west africa. so i think you're right to point out, the united states has to play a role, but it needs to be part of a multi lateral effort in order to have a chance at success. >> thank you, madam secretary. we have discussed many important issues. i remain concerned about whether the accountability review bo
government and the libyan government. i saw firsthand what is called, timely and exceptional coordination. no delays in decision making. no denials of support from washington or our military. i want to echo the review board praise for the valor and courage of the people on the ground, especially the security professionals in benghazi and tripoli. american lives were saved in real time. the next morning, i told the american people that heavily armed militants -- i stood with president obama as he spoke about an act of terror. it is important to recall in that same time period, we were seeing violent attacks in cairo, as well as large protests outside many other posts, where thousands of our diplomats served. so i immediately ordered a review of our security posture around the world, with particular scrutiny for high- threat posts. and i asked the department of defense to join interagency security assessment teams and to dispatch hundreds of additional marine security guards. i named the first deputy assistant secretary of state for high threat posts so that missions in dangerous places get
the cases about can the government fly over your home and use technology that emanates from your home? we have had questions about gps navigators and we will have many market and the forefathers had no idea and the computer chips would come in and benjamin franklin i felt very much. [laughter] he never imagined these today. if they used terms that were more specific than they did, we wouldn't have been given the opportunity for the experience so they did a mixture of some very things. you can't do this, what did we forget about today you can't court of the militia in people's homes except in times of war. that's pretty specific but there were many other things. it gives a concept as we are guided by that concept. >> what worries you about the constitution, are there any trends, issues that he might have gura on? [laughter] i don't think this is before they talk about it, but i will talk about one thing the recent elections in have any gratification about. our forefathers were citizens statesman. back then by the way they were all meant so that's why i use the word statesman. they were peo
to start governing from a con seventive perspective. and i don't know what everybody else said about the deal we're going to do tomorrow but i'm actually ok with what leadership is doing right now because they actually have an agenda. the agenda is to get to balance in 10 years, to have a balanced budge, not just to pass a budget that balances in 10 year bus to actually achieve balance in 10 years. if you look at what we're going to do, we're going to pass a three or four-month extension of the debt ceiling. then we're going to get into a fight on the sequester and hold the line of the sequester. this is a promise the leadership is making to us. as long as they keep that promise i think many conservatives will be ok with that. then when we get to the debt ceiling fight we're going to ask for at a minimum the one--- the one-for-one cuts that come from the boehner rule for any long-term debt ceiling extension system of if we look at that, it means that in 10 to 15 years, with very little help from the democrats, we can achieve a balanced budget which is much better than even the 23- to
organic law. and saying that the constitution could not possibly have anticipated our every governing question. i invite you to imagine if you will, just close your eyes and just imagine the right wing outcry. if president obama called the constitution organic law. instead of saying this. liberals have always understood that, they understood it when president lincoln said it and when president obama said it. but conservatives have never, ever understood that when times change, so must we. and the day conservatives actually do understand that, they will no longer be conservatives. >>> obama land. let's play "hardball." ♪ >>> good evening. i'm chris matthews in washington. let me start tonight with this. yesterday we discovered the obama doctrine. put simply, it's to continue the american revolution well into the 21st century. defined economic equality for women, full equality all out for gay people. and full political and financial opportunity for people of color. everything about yesterday screamed with this manifesto from the makeup of the crowd to the people in the inaugural platf
to be the nation states where we already are seeing cyber intrusions' both against our government and against private sector, but increasingly common on state actors will have more capacity to disrupt and to hack into put out false information to accuse the united states of things that can light five years before we can put them out. so, you know, i think it's important we have a really thoughtful comprehensive review about the threats of today and tomorrow and that will help guide the committee and the senate and the administration working together to answer them. >> thank you madam chair and onto something that hasn't been done. i'm going to yield back the rest of my time. >> we will not go to mr. perot of texas pittard >> thank you mr. chairman and madame secretary for your service to the country. gordon roland from oregon, frederick from texas and victor am i district of texas, three americans overseas killed not in benghazi, that killed at a remote gas facility in algeria. killed in my opinion because they were americans. over the last weekend, myself and others have tried to get informa
additional tax incentives. finally, and most important, we should have the federal government lead by example. the department of energy's management of four large marketing agency should be the gold standard for integrating renewables into the grid, upgrading transmission capacity and leading on conservation. the g.s.a., with over 300 million square feet of federal office space, should demand that all our facilities, every one we at least buy or build, should be of the highest energy efficiency. the federal fleet should be on the cutting edge of fuel efficiency standards. and finally, the department of defense, the largest consumer of energy in the world, needs to redouble its efforts. the pentagon is already moving in the right direction, but it's not just about saving money in the long term. it's providing operational flexibility and reducing velarde nurblet from inefficient and dangerous fossil fuels. those fuel tanker trucks in afghanistan and iraq might as well have had great big bull's eyes on them for terrorists. the military knows this, and we should give maximum support even in a tim
on fox news. [ laughter ] >> the president made the case for big government. >> this speech today was an ode to big government. it was a hymn to big government. at his heart, i think president obama is a socialist. >> stephen: yes, at his heart he is a socialist. ever notice how it shares the blood with all the other organs? [ laughter ] well sorry, obama, your class warfare isn't going to work. fox news contributor and shamwow pitchman stuart varney knows the reason why. [ laughter ] >> rich people, powerful people, in america today, are reviled. they're dismissed as fat cats who don't pay their fair share. we just hate 'em-- rich people are evil. yet, along comes this show "downton abbey"-- rich people prominently featured and they're generous; they're nice people; they create jobs, for heaven's sake; they're classy; they've got style and we love 'em. that show is wildly popular, which poses a threat to the left, doesn't it? >> stephen: yes, it does. >> stephen: yes, the popularity of "downton abbey" proves that america loves rich guys. the same way the popularity of "breaking b
is all about. people who maintain an almost total skepticism about what government can accomplish for the good of this country. he talked about all the good things government does, whether it's education or it's a safety net or it's regulation when it has to be done in terms of big business. he launched all those good reasons and then he said, of course, there are people who retain a reasonable skepticism about the role of government in this country. that debate is going to continue. i thought that was an amazing effort. he's not going to win any support from the tea party. he might win though, the congressman may know better, he might be able to make some of the people who represent the suburbs who are not so far right realize this guy is not their enemy. he is somewhat to their left but he's probably as reasonable as anybody to their right in terms of politics these days. >> chris -- >> i think the battle today is between people that want government to function, want the debate to continue, and people that want to take their ball and go home and end government, shut it down, use
, but it has to have a component of the state and government to help foster it, and the line that really stuck out to me was these truths can be self-evident, but they're not self-executing. what he made was a case for why there is an important role for the government to play to basically protect our rights but also to advance us as a society whether it's on climate change, immigration reform, bank regulations, and so on down the list. it was a progressive case, but it wasn't necessarily a big government case. saying there's a mix of -- >> let's talk about some examples. i think you know them. the right wing ideas of rights is leave me alone, i got enough guns here in this house to hold you off for a couple days anyway if the government comes in with helicopters. progressives' idea of rights is a couple young people would like to go to the university of mississippi. it took the federal troops to go in there to get them in the door. a governor named george wallace tried to stop people at the door at the university of alabama, they had to be pushed aside. that's an aggressive communitarian notio
of the choice that was made to put in combined sewer systems. narrator: in 1994, the government adopted a combined sewer overflow policy to reduce csos nationwide. cities with combined sewer overflows now face an enforcement action called a consent decree. under a consent decree, a city must reduce pollution levels significantly within a strict time frame or face heavy fines. in 1960, the combined sewer overflows were a perfectly legitimate way of dealing with sewers. woman: the mind set was that, what did it matter if we were sending our waste downstream? water was a good conveyance for pollution. man: sewer systems are installed to reduce public health problems. now what you're doing is transferring the problem, you're transferring it to downstream cities. in addition, cities and towns above pittsburgh were doing the same thing. and then they were affecting the water intakes of pittsburgh. 90% of this region gets its drinking water from those same rivers that we have overflows occurring. hecht: we have sewage overflow with as little as 1/10" inch of rain. and our average storm here is
to pay attention, not just local people but the federal government. it would write letters, do all kinds. no one would pay any attention. the sole rights commission decided that first year it would go out and listen to these people and see what they had to say. they had the power to subpoena anyone. eisenhower said, the reason why i want to get it passed by congress instead of issuing an executive order is because by attorney general tells me that is the only way they can subpoena anybody. given what the problems are, some people may not want to come to testify. so the commission most important power of subpoena. they went and looked all over the place to see what the problems or. they made recommendations that were controversial but seemed to make sense. so after they had been there for a while it was clear they need to be reauthorize to needed to be continued to work on these issues. then of course bell rock crisis and those civil-rights movement started to heat up. it was clear that there was a need. in the commission spent the next few years figuring out what to recommend to the gove
, but they have been working off a continuing resolution which funds the government for certain amount of time. it will end on march 27. house leaders tried to put forward or sketched out a game plan for how they would handle things going forward. the first step in all this is the vote today on a short-term debt limit extension. host: seth, you mentioned the republican retreat last week and on conversations with conservatives, an event on capitol hill yesterday. what kind of dissent did you hear from conservative republicans on the debt ceiling vote? guest: they want to make sure that they get some sort of deficit reduction out of this. i think it makes them a little nervous. this is what many will referred to as a clean vote on the debt ceiling, if they're not a lot of strings attached. they would like to see more deficit reduction. i think they are a little weary that leadership will follow through on their promises. so it is within that vein. i guess i would say that conservative lawmakers, at least the most conservative, wants to be cautiously optimistic that house leaders might follow thr
deficits, but he signalled split decisions in an era of divided government. >> progress does not compel us to settle. centuries long debates about the role of government for all time, but it does require us to act in our time. [applause] >> for now decisions are upon us. and we cannot afford to wait. we cannot mistake absolutism for principle or substitute spectacle for politics or treat name calling as reasoned debate. [applause] >> we must act. we must act knowing that our work will be unperfect. we must act knowing that today's victories will be only partial. peter: top republicans issued bipartisan statements in the spirit of the day, but mitch mcconnell, the senate republican leader called federal spending and the debt the transcendent challenge of the great challenges of our day. david: was it president harrison who had a two hour speech at his inauguration that he caught pneumonia. this was one of the quickest speeches i have ever seen before. but bottom line here, the president, a lot of people say it sounded more like an acceptance speech at a convention than it did at an inaugura
response from the state department. the libyan government. so i saw firsthand what ambassador pickering and former chairman mullen called "timely and exceptional coordination." no delays in decision-making no denials of support from washington or from our military and i want to echo the review board's praise for the valor and courage of our people on the ground especially the security professionals in benghazi and tripoli. the board said the response saved american lives in real time and it did. the very next morning, i told the american people that heavily-armed militants assaulted our compound. and i vowed to bring them to justice. and i stood with president obama in the rose garden as he spoke of an act of terror. it's also important to recall that in that same period, we were seeing violent attacks on our embassies in cairo tunis khartoum as well as large protests outside many other posts where thousands of our diplomats served. >> she's doing good! >> i ordered a review around the world with particular scrutiny for high-threat posts. i asked the department of defense to join intera
a volley and government. the democrats typically say, well, government can do this or can't do that ask so it's really a series of arguments over the role of government and the second thing i'm curious to know about is how tough they were in a pretty partisan atmosphere. he has gotten tougher over the past couple of years with the opposition. how feist you he is he during the speech. >> things people have picked up in this run up to this inauguration is that the president four years ago in his speech came tout and he actually made a comment about how he was going to to bring an end to the petty grievances and false promises in washington. now four years later was that a false promise? >> yes. i mean, the president, i think, understandably confident and an historic election and all of that perhaps overstated what could be done. this is one place where he seen having come fiercely short and it's in bringing that sense to washington of bipartisanship and of working together and overcoming partisanship and his defenders and supporters will say oh, the republicans have been intransient and smal
the debt limit as the government faces another shut down possibly within weeks. will that happen? >> we need to stop spending. we need to reduce spending. but it would be better if we figure out how to do that in a targeted way, rather than across the board way. look what mommy is having. mommy's having a french fry. yes she is, yes she is. [ bop ] [ male announcer ] could've had a v8. 100% vegetable juice, with three of your daily vegetable servings in every little bottle. of green giant vegetables it's easy to eat like a giant... ♪ and feel like a green giant. ♪ ho ho ho ♪ green giant martha: all right. there was a frightening scene after a plane blew out four tires landing. it happened at newark airport. 13 people were onboard this plane. it was a flight from rochester, new york, to newark. reports are that nobody was hurt. we'll continue to keep a look at that situation. we'll let you know if there is any information on that. looks like everybody is okay. scary situation though. bill: republican senator roy blunt said president obama was confrontational in his first term. tell
government about whether or not her husband would be released. i am bream -- shannon bream. this group has been fighting, trying to help the pastor with this case. jordan, thanks for coming in. was the sentencing expected? how was this playing out? >> yesterday, we knew, we had got know a weird comment from a close family friend, the guy willing to put up the bail and it was denied, 20 times. it was a joke, but he kept trying to make that point. final he, the court told him, you do this again, we are going on raid your house and you will end up in prison and we will ruin your business. he goes to the court, their first day of business is saturday there, fully operational. yesterday, to get his documents back that he had put down to start the bail process -- he said, okay, i can't risk my family for this anymore. the court assistant, basically who, runs this, the administrator, the right-hand man of the hanging judge, tells him, bail's not important. his lawyer needs to come here tomorrow because we may just release him. we knew, the family friend knew it wasn't true. they never called the
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